Solid Waste Management Plan

 
The Department of Public Works is now implementing its latest Solid Waste Management Plan. The Prince William Board of County Supervisors (BOCS) and the state have approved the plan. 
 
The executive summary below has been approved by the BOCS. If you would like to review the complete plan and all the associated materials you may find a copy in the County Libraries or call 703-792-4670 to arrange to review the plan in the Department of Public Works offices.
 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Chapter 1 -  PLANNING APPROACH

This comprehensive solid waste management plan (SWMP) provides Prince William County’s integrated strategy for the management of non-hazardous solid waste generated within the County over the next 20 years. In compliance with Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Regulations the planning process establishes minimum solid waste management (SWM) standards and planning requirements for protection of the public health public safety the environment and natural resources. This plan will help meet the County’s strategic goal to provide a safe environment and encourage economic development by providing long term and stable solid waste management and disposal services for the community.

1.1       Planning District

Prince William County and the Towns of Dumfries Occoquan Quantico and Haymarket have formed a region for Solid Waste Management that is addressed by this plan. When the term County is used in this plan it shall include the County and the Towns cited above.

Chapter 2 -  WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AND PROJECTIONS

The County has and continues to grow in population housing and employment over the last decades. This growth will continue to increase the amount of waste generated in the County.

2.1        Municipal Solid Waste

The Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) category includes solid waste generated by residential business industrial and institutional establishments. This includes rubbish trash and garbage produced by households apartment buildings hotels and motels businesses including offices stores and restaurants and institutions such as schools and hospitals.

Please note the County plan does not include City-generated MSW.

2.2 Construction and Demolition Debris

Construction and demolition debris (CDD) constitutes a major portion of the total County solid waste stream. CDD includes solid waste that is produced or generated during construction remodeling or repair of pavements houses commercial buildings and other structures solid waste that is produced by the destruction of structures and their foundations and wastes resulting from land clearing operations.  No specific historical information is available for the amount of CDD waste which has been generated in the County and disposed at private facilities.

2.3  Special Wastes

Waste Generation Activities

Special wastes are components of the County solid waste stream that have unique collection disposal or recycling requirements. In Prince William County these wastes include household hazardous wastes (HHW) regulated medical wastes (RMW) tires oil and antifreeze batteries septage sludge and ash.

The estimated amounts of HHW RMW used tires used oil antifreeze automotive batteries and septage which are generated and disposed are included in Section 2 of the Plan.

2.4  Waste Generation Forecast

Waste generation projections are based on the predicted per capita waste generation rate and recycling rate and population projections for the planning period.

For planning purposes the County has chosen to develop a best-case (scenario 1) and worst-case (scenario 2) projection for MSW generation as presented in the table below.  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has estimated the current average CDD generation rate to be 2.85 pounds per capita per day.  The projection for CDD is based on a 1 percent per year increase in the CDD generation rate over the planning period. 

Table 2 – Waste Generation Projections 

Year

Population

Generation Factor
 (pcd)

Tot. Waste Generation (tons)

Recycled (percent)

Recycled (tons)

Disposed (tons)

MSW

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scenario 1

 

 

 

 

 

2005

339900

6.87

426158

34%

144894

281264

2010

376200

6.87

471670

38%

179235

292435

2015

400600

6.87

502262

40%

200905

301357

2020

414800

6.87

520066

40%

208026

312040

2025

425900

6.87

533983

40%

213593

320390

Scenario 2

 

 

 

 

 

2005

339900

7.01

434724

30%

130417

304307

2010

376200

7.37

505694

30%

151708

353986

2015

400600

7.74

565962

30%

169789

396173

2020

414800

8.14

615916

30%

184775

431141

2025

425900

8.55

664657

30%

199397

465260

CDD

 

 

 

 

 

 

2005

339900

2.88

178952

0%

0

178952

2010

376200

3.03

208166

0%

0

208166

2015

400600

3.19

232975

0%

0

232975

2020

414800

3.35

253539

0%

0

253539

2025

425900

3.52

273603

0%

0

273603

Chapter 3 - EXISTING SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

The swift and continuing growth in both residential and commercial development has resulted in additional demands on the solid waste management system of Prince William County.

The County relies on private refuse haulers to collect solid waste. Citizens may self-haul waste to County disposal facilities and established drop-offs.

The County disposes of solid waste at the Princ William County Sanitary Landfill and the Fairfax I-95 Energy Resource Recovery Facility under an agreement with the County. Currently construction demolition and debris waste generated within the County is disposed primarily at various private CDD landfill and transfer stations in the region.

No hazardous waste is accepted at County solid waste facilities. A Household Hazardous Waste Facility is located at the County Landfill to serve citizens. Regulated medical waste is transported and disposed at facilities located outside the County.

Recycling is mandatory in the County. All waste haulers must offer recycling services to residents and businesses. The County also provides drop-off centers for recycling.  A Central Processing Facility located at the County landfill processes material collected. A yard waste composting facility at Balls Ford Road accepts leaves grass and brush for composting. A mulching facility is also located at the County landfill.

Two Solid Waste Citizen Advisory Group advises and provides input to the County staff and the Board on solid waste issues. Public information and education using all available media and special events to encourage participation in the County’s recycling programs and proper practices in storing collection and disposing of solid waste.

The County’s solid waste system is a separate enterprise fund within the County government funded primarily from user fees. The Prince William Board of County Supervisors implemented a County-wide solid waste user fee to replace gate (tipping) fees in 1998. This fee is included as a separated line item on the real estate property tax bill and charged to all waste generators. The Towns of Dumfries Quantico Haymarket and Occoquan do not participate in the County-wide solid waste fee. Any waste delivered from the Town and Cities is charged a tipping fee.

Chapter 4 - Solid Waste Management Hierarchy

In accordance with the Virginia Solid Waste Management Regulations the County's comprehensive solid waste management plan must consider and address all components of the solid waste hierarchy. The solid waste management hierarchy ranks methods of handling solid waste from most preferred methods of source reduction reuse and recycling in that order to least preferred methods of energy/resource recovery/incineration and landfilling.

 

Chapter 5 -  PLAN OBJECTIVES and Chapter  6 -  IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

Goal 1: Continue to provide a cost-effective and environmentally protective sanitary landfill within the County for the disposal of non-recycled municipal solid waste (MSW) and to extend the life of the landfill for as long as possible. 

1.       Project County MSW generation and disposal requirements for the 20-year planning period.

1.1.   Update projections each year and as necessary 

2.       Monitor the remaining capacity and expansion requirements for the County landfill.

2.1.   Update landfill topographic mapping on a regular basis (minimum of every two years) to access remaining disposal capacity.

2.2.   Estimated life of landfill for Scenario 1 (Low) waste generation estimates is until 2053

2.3.   Estimated life of landfill for Scenario 2 (High) waste generation estimates is until 2043.

3.       Design and construct expansion cells and closure phases as required.

4.       Operate the Landfill in compliance with all applicable regulations.

5.       Evaluate and implement new technologies which maximize the use of Landfill space such as use of alternated daily cover and the technology.

6.       Maximize the utilization of landfill gas/methane for power production and other energy uses.

6.1.   Evaluate installation of additional engines and generators

6.2.   Utilize excess gas for on-site heating on other energy needs 

 

Goal 2: Ensure that efficient MSW collection services are available for County residents at a reasonable cost.

1.       Monitor and evaluate service levels traffic and environmental impacts.

2.       Revise County ordinances as required.

3.       Evaluate the potential for County administration of MSW collection districts as necessary.

 

Goal 3: Continue the implementation of a County-wide recycling plan including yard waste composting that will meet or exceed the recycling rate mandated by the Virginia DEQ. 

1.       Evaluate opportunities for increasing recycling in businesses institutions and multifamily dwelling units.

1.1.   Improve public outreach to promote and encourage more recycling to include distribution of brochures businesses recycling forums and recognition program.

2.       Expand the types of recyclables collected in the County as feasible.

2.1.   Evaluate alternative to include mixed paper in mandatory curbside collection program. Implement if feasible.

2.2.   Expand Central Processing facility as needed to handle additional and larger volumes of materials.

2.3.   Evaluate feasibility and costs of mandatory yard waste collection. Implement if feasible and cost effective and if processing capacity is available.

3.       Conduct site-selection evaluations for an additional or larger yard waste composting site.

4.       Continuously evaluate the locations for drop-off centers throughout the County.

5.       Improve public outreach programs to better promote and identify recycling opportunities.

6.       Evaluate the capacity of the Recycling Processing Center to meet County recyclable processing requirements for the planning period.

 

Goal 4: Continue and expand solid waste source reduction and reuse programs. 

  1. Continue operation of the County Too Good to Waste Place at the Landfill.
  2. Improve public outreach programs to better promote and identify source reduction and reuse opportunities.
  3. Identify and implement source reduction and reuse alternatives for County government facilities.
  4. Promote residential grasscycling.

Goal 5: Coordinate with the private sector to help find cost-effective recycling and disposal options for construction and demolition debris (CDD) remain available for businesses engaged in construction activities within the County. 

1.       Support private CDD recycling initiatives in the County and on a regional basis.

2.       Evaluate establishment of CDD recycling programs in the County and region in coordination with the private sector. 

 

Goal 6: Continue to provide adequate collection services for special wastes generated within the County.

1.       Evaluate and expand as necessary collection services for household hazardous waste and other wastes that require special handling transport and disposal.

2.       Monitor and work with the local hospitals and medical community to ensure regulated medical waste is properly handled and disposed.

3.       Continue to provide a coordinated program for litter pick-up with the Clean Community Council and Virginia Department of Transportation.

 

Goal 7: Provide adequate funding for implementing County solid waste management programs.

1.       Project funding requirements for the SWM program for the planning period.

1.1.   Update 5-year revenue and expense projections each year. 

2.       Annually evaluate the adequacy of the County Solid Waste User Fee to fund required programs and implement modifications as required.

3.       When the landfill debt is retired in 2014 reevaluate the User Fee program including future funding requirements needs options and rates.

3.1.   Consider alternative disposal options to further increase the life of the County landfill including a transfer stations to transfer waste to other available facilities.

Goal 8: Continue cooperation with adjacent jurisdictions to implement beneficial solid waste management programs on a regional basis. 

1.       Continue to participate in Northern Virginia Regional Commission Solid Waste Board and Metropolitan Washington COG meetings to identify opportunities for regional solid waste management cooperation.

2.       Continue the “trash trade” agreement with Fairfax County.

2.1.   Review during renegotiation of Fairfax County's service agreement with the waste-to-energy facility operator.

3.       Continue to evaluate regional solid waste management opportunities with adjacent jurisdictions.

4.       Continue to benchmark with other jurisdictions to monitor the Service Efforts and Accomplishments Report.

Chapter 7 - PLAN FUNDING
The County’s solid waste system operates as an Enterprise Fund within the County and is not supported with general tax revenues.  All programs are funded from user fees and other revenue associated with the operation of the system.

7.1  Projected Costs  - The County projects annual expenses for at least five years and are updated annually.  Current projections of all solid waste system costs have been made through 2011. 

7.2 Revenue Sources  - The primary source of revenue to fund County solid waste disposal system is the County-wide solid waste user fee. A flat fee is charged to residential units based upon the type of unit (single-family townhouse multi-family and mobile home).  Non-residential properties including businesses institutions and governments are charged based upon the amount of waste generated.

Other revenue sources included the sale of recyclable material tipping fees from town and city waste royalties from the sale of landfill gas and interest income. 

Chapter 8.0 PUBLIC PARITICIPATION

8.1  Plan Development  This Plan was developed in coordination and input from the Solid Waste Citizen Advisory Committee (CAC) and Landfill Citizen Oversight Committee (COC).  In 2009,  the two committees were merged into the Solid Waste Citizen Advisory Group.

8.2 Plan Review and Approval

The final draft of the Plan was reviewed by the CAC and COC (now known as SWCAG) and distributed for public comment. Copies of the Plan were placed in all public libraries and County offices and this Web page is a summary of the Plan.

Three public information meetings were advertised in the local papers and held on May 24 25 and June 10 2004. Comments from the public were received at these meetings.

After comments from these meetings and public outreach a final plan was developed for final review and adoption by the Board. A formal public hearing was held on June 22 2004. After the public hearing the Board adopted the 2004 Updated Solid Waste Management Plan.

7.3 Future Public Outreach

The County will continue to use all available media to provide outreach and obtain input from the public.

Solid Waste Citizen Advisory Group (SWCAG)- The SWCAG established and appointed by the Board of County Supervisors will continue to meet and provide input to the Board and County staff on solid waste and landfill issues. 

Waste Reduction and Recycling Promotion - The County will promote its programs to reduce the amount of waste disposed through source reduction recycling and composting.  The County will work in conjunction with residents businesses and haulers to encourage recycling efforts. Various forms of the media will continue to be used to contact a large segment of the population.

    • Use of the County’s Web page
    • Fliers and brochures for residents and businesses
    • Specific campaigns for new targeted materials
    • Participation in the outreach group called L.E.E.P. (Local Environmental Education Partners)
    • Newspaper advertisements
    • Direct mailings and inserts in the County’s INFOCUS newsletter
    • Advertisements on local television channels
    • Special events award programs and contests
    • Partner with the County schools for recycling education