Battles, Death and the History of Bristoe Station

 

Soldiers camped here in 1861 and 1862. Federal and Confederate 005057.jpgarmies clashed here at the Battle of Kettle Run on Aug. 27 1862 when Gen. 'Stonewall' Jackson's Confederate forces raided Federal supplies at Manassas Junction. Gen. Joseph Hooker's Federal troops attacked Jackson's rear guard led by Gen. Richard Ewell along Kettle Run. Ewell's troops fought Hooker's men then withdrew. On Aug. 28-30 Ewell's forces faced Federal troops again during Second Manassas. You can follow the path of the battle on this Bristoe Station Battle Map.

 
In October and November 1863 Gen. Robert E. Lee's Confederate army and Maj. Gen. George Meade's Federal forces fought a series of battles known as the Bristoe Campaign.
The Oct. 14 1863 Battle of Bristoe Station was one of these battles. Here Lt. Gen. A.P. Hill's Confederate corps stumbled upon Gen. Gouverneur Warren's Federal troops posted at the Orange & Alexandria Railroad. The Federals fiercely defended their position inflicted heavy Confederate casualties and captured a battery of Confederate artillery. Hill's defeat effectively halted Lee's Bristoe offensive.
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Attack on Bristoe Station” by Alfred A. Waugh, Harper’s Weekly Nov. 7 1863.
 
In 2000, Centex Homes purchased this land. Two years later, Centex Homes developed New Bristow Village and gave the battlefield parcel to the Civil War Preservation Trust. Prince William County acquired the 133-acre site in 2007. This park demonstrates how developers, residents, preservationists and local governments can work together to save historic resources. 
 
 
Alabama Cemetery at Bristoe
Beginning in August 1861, thousands of Confederates encamped around Bristoe Station.  Most of the men were from the states of Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.  Due to disease and other ailments caused by bad sanitary conditions of the camps, hundreds of men died at Camp Jones.  Most of these men were buried in the fields surrounding Bristoe Station in cemeteries dedicated to the individual states.  One such cemetery, the Alabama Cemetery, is located in the park boundaries today.   We only know the name of half the men buried here, but you can contact us at 703-366-3049 for a list of the known burials in the cemetery.
 
In December 2011, an Eagle Scout, scouts and County staff worked to clean up this once forgotten cemetery.  Plans call for a monument to the men in the cemetery and a trail leading visitors to the cemetery.  If you are interested in donating funds for this project, please contact the Prince William Historic Preservation Foundation at www.pwhpf.org