Sign In
alert

Trending Searches: Job OpportunitiesParks | Library

RELIC Programs

PLEASE NOTE our current hours:

While access to the RELIC collection is available whenever Bull Run Library is open, there may not always be a RELIC staff member available to help. If you require individual assistance and/or are traveling from a distance, you may wish to call 703-792-4540 and/or email us to verify the hours when RELIC staff will be available. Current staffed hours for RELIC.
All programs are presented at the Bull Run Regional Library, unless otherwise noted. To register for the following free programs, contact RELIC @ (703) 792-4540 or relic2@pwcgov.org.

 
 
THE STORY OF RAVENSWORTH

​Ravensworth was the largest colonial land grant in Fairfax County, some 24,112 acres. This is a story of colonial settlement, early government, tobacco plantations, slavery, civil war, economic expansion, the rise and decline of family farms, and suburban development - next door to the nation's capital - involving people, places, and events, both famous and obscure. Notable historic figures connected to Ravensworth include George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Robert E. Lee. Author John Browne shares this story. Register at 703-792-4540 or relic2@pwcgov.org.

Tuesday, April 23, 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

FINDING YOUR FAMILY IN THE NEWS

​RELIC’s Don Wilson will describe how a growing number of newspapers online may be searched for items useful for family and local history. Now you can find obituaries, marriage notices, court cases, advertisements, news items, local gossip, and photos -anything that might appear between the pages of the hometown gazette. Register at 703-792-4540 or relic2@pwcgov.org

Thursday, May 16, 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

GRAFFITI HOUSES: THE CIVIL WAR FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF INDIVIDUAL SOLDIERS

Dr. Stephen Robertson, Professor and Director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History & New Media at George Mason University, will present a program on the "graffiti houses" of Northern Virginia, including Prince William's Ben Lomond. With the evacuation of the Confederate Army from Manassas, federal forces occupied the area by the spring of 1862. The plaster walls of Ben Lomond were soon covered in graffiti from floor to ceiling. Historically, graffiti has led to an understanding of the lifestyle and language of both ancient and modern cultures. Register at 703-792-4540 or relic2@pwcgov.org

​PLEASE NOTE: We are always adding new programs.
 
The Friends of Bull Run Library Need You.
Please consider joining the Friends of Bull Run Library whose efforts generously provide funding support for RELIC’s programming and help fund special speakers*. We need your membership and help with their major source of revenue, The Friends Book Shop, located in the lobby of Bull Run Library. Pick up a Friends membership application in RELIC or ask at the front information desk. Thank you very much for your consideration.​

Disclaimer

You are now leaving the official Prince William County Government website.