The Computer Aided Dispatch/Records Management System Negotiation Team
 
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The team is represented by Ellen Wills, Kevin Hughart, Michele Surdam, Scott Boggs, Tim McCormick, and Tom Pulaski. They were nominated by Police Chief Steve Hudson and Battalion Chief Tim Keen.
 
Through a negotiation that lasted a total of 21 days over a 15-week period, this team shaved off more than $7 million in the initial purchase cost of a new Computer Aided Dispatch-Record Management System. At the same time, they negotiated with the selected system vendor to save another $2.5 million in maintenance and support costs over the life of the contract. And they found $600,000 in grant money to apply toward the cost of the project. The team’s negotiations ensured that the vendor could meet the needs of the organization and do so within budget, which included the “first of its kind” life cycle management pricing. The team also made sure that the vendor understood more than 5,000 requirements spanning all of the public safety
agencies by discussing each requirement, line-by-line. The team reviewed all aspects of the project to include training, deployment, implementation schedules, communications and risk management plans. Coordinating with Public Safety Communications, Police and Fire and Rescue, the team members created a unified and all-encompassing position for Prince William County, which was critical to the success of the negotiations.
  
 
 
Department of Fire & Rescue’s Heavy Technical Rescue Instructor Program Team
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This team is represented by Battalion Chief Kurt Heindrichs, Lt. Bryan Janda, Lt. Jim Mirabile, Lt. Josh Dempsey, Lt. Steve Brubaker, Lt. Tom Klimtzak, Tech-II Damian Marsh, Tech-II Danny Beck, Tech-II Dave Caruana, Tech-II Josh Thomson, Tech-II Kevin Tobey, Tech-II Mike Mishler, Tech-II Ross Shannon and Tech-II Scott Coloe.  They were nominated by Battalion Chief Tim Keen.
 
Historically, demand for HTR classes in the county has outstripped the Virginia Department of Fire Programs’ ability to provide an adequate number of instructors. As a result, the needs of the county's fire and rescue system were not being met. For 3 years, the Department of Fire and Rescue had asked the Virginia  
Department of Fire Programs for permission to institute a train-the-trainer program. In 2012, they relented, even though there was no precedence for such a program. While the team members had no idea what to
expect, they were well aware of the Department of Fire Programs’ dismal success rate in previous stabs at instructor development. The team members, however, were undaunted. To get through the program, they had to pass written and skills tests and successfully prove their knowledge of equipment, skills, techniques, safety practices and ability to instruct students during practical training sessions. In all, they devoted 35 of their 40 week days in two months to becoming instructors. They invested their time and energy, and put their
reputations on the line, to work to become instructors for a program that Chief McGee stated is “strategically important” to the success of the county’s fire and rescue system. At the completion of the program, all of the instructors successfully completed their testing and sat for their Train-the-Trainer qualifications exams. They all passed.