Prince William County Emergency Operations Plan

The Plan

Prince William County is governed by the Commonwealth of Virginia Disaster and Emergency Services Laws which require that we have a Director of Emergency Services and an Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). The EOP clearly defines how various County agencies and community partners mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters. The County has a designated Emergency Operations Center (EOC) where key decision-makers gather to implement the EOP when a disaster occurs.

Leaders

The County Executive serves as the Director of Emergency Management. Patrick M. Collins is the Coordinator of Emergency Management and serves under the operational control of the Director. Deputy Coordinators serve on a rotating schedule to ensure staff is available to respond 24/7.

Issues

The County's EOP is based on an "all hazards" planning approach which considers all likely natural and man-made disasters that might threaten the County. County agencies respond to emergencies every day. Personnel are trained to handle major emergencies such as mass casualty incidents, hazardous materials, building collapses, public health threats, fires and hostage situations. These agencies develop and maintain plans for specific situations and buildings in the County so that they are prepared to respond immediately.

Community Partners

The County's disaster response is coordinated with the Virginia Department of Health, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality and the Virginia Department of Emergency Management as well as other agencies that have a role in emergency response such as the  American Red Cross. Representatives from these agencies are invited to participate in the County's EOC when it is activated. County agencies also participate in regional and state-wide mutual aid programs. Through these programs we can access resources from the entire region at a moment's notice.

Updates

The County's EOP is updated regularly as information changes. Each year sections of the plan are reviewed and adjusted and periodic drills are conducted to test preparedness. The entire EOP is updated every four years and submitted to the County Board of County Supervisors for final approval and adoption.